Gjallarhorn :: Sjofn

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Sjofn by Gjallarhorn

Originally posted on Epinions

The Nordic sub-genre may not be as popular as Irish Folk in World Music category, but a considerable number of main-stream and folk artists have emerged from the Scandinavian region. Gjallarhorn (pronounced yahl-lahr-hawrn) has been in the music scene since 1994, and has achieved significant success like other reputable groups, e.g. Hedningarna, Garmarna, and Hoven Droven, that originate in the region. Gjallarhorn has all the more reason to be unique, since they hail from Ostrobothnia, a Swede-predominant region of Finland.


In Sjofn, Gjallarhorn‘s second album, you will encounter the great Norse pagan folk tradition based on fiddle music, inter-woven perfectly with musical instruments of different cultural origins: didgeridoo, darbouka, djembe, conga, and numerous others. If the music does not half please you, Jenny Wilhelms’ confident vocal melodies will!

The first track, undeniably the best on the album, is an ode to the Nordic spring-goddess Suvetar. The fertility divinity is urged to arise and awaken the seeds that will usher the countryside into a congenial season of productivity. Very earthy, yet so sweet, the song features the droning of the Australian didgeridoo, complemented by hand-drums and bells. The pagan goddess is sure to visualize in your imagination with Wilhelms’ seemingly effortless transitions between notes. Originally a Karelian Finnish folk song, Suvetar has featured as the first track in the 3rd volume of Nordic Roots compilation by North Side.

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